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Viewing posts for the category Interesting Natural Feature

Parc de la Vanoise (French Alps)

Pont de Peche to Lac Peclet Polset, Parc de la Vanoise (French Alps)

This hike was one of the best hikes I have done and one of the easiest 12-mike hikes I have done. The views of mountains, needle peaks, streams, several cascading waterfalls, blooming wildflowers and finally the blue lake at the end, kept me well distracted.

Garrapata State Park, Big Sur, California

Our hike at Garrapata Beach started just south of Sobranes Point. We walked along the path towards the coast. There were beautiful blooming yellow and orange wildflowers along the way. As we reached the coast we saw some purple and white flowering succulents. We followed the path along the coast which eventually went towards the little hill, then over a foot bridge. The trail continued past the bridge but ended soon after.

Colorado

Our last spring break led us to explore parts of Colorado. I was hoping to see some of the blue alpine lakes I had seen in so many pictures, but early April proved to be a-less-than-ideal time of year for high-country Colorado alpine lakes.  Most high elevation lakes were frozen over in a crisp translucent white sheet, the roads leading to it known for being narrow, winding and icy, and our sea-level bodies would not fare very well walking in snow, cold temperatures and high elevation. Given all those reasons, we opted for the shorter, easier hikes that were somewhat easy to get to in Colorado Springs and Boulder, in addition to the ones in Rocky Mountain National Park. 

Rings Trail, Mojave National Preserve, California

This hike was an exciting one, though short in distance.  The trailhead we took was off the parking lot loop (Not the picnic area) which led us past some petroglyphs, over some short desert brush, and under giant light colored rocks dotted with many many holes.

Trona Pinnacles, San Bernardino County, California

If you are looking for an otherworldly landscape, this is the place for you. A skyline made up of about 500 tall tufa spires dotted the barren landscape as we walked in an ancient dry lakebed named Searle Lake. Searle Lake was one of many lakes filled with glacial meltwater connecting the Sierra Nevada to Death Valley as glaciers melted from the Sierra Nevada mountain range.  According to one of the information boards, half of  all of earth's minerals are found on this lake bed, one of which is trona, the park's namesake.