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Viewing posts from December, 2015

Budget Friendly Tips - New Mexico

Trip TOTAL:  Our trip to New Mexico came out to be one of the least expensive we have had thus far, grand totaling at just under $700 for a whole week of exploration for our family of five (includes flight, hotel and rental car)

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Our many hikes in New Mexico was complemented by our visit to the city of Santa Fe. Located an hour away from Albuquerque, Santa Fe is the oldest and highest (elevation) US capital city. It was the capital of the three different countries that New Mexico has been part of in the last few hundred years: Spain, Mexico and presently U.S.A. The oldest standing church in USA (San Miguel) is situated here. We had a quick pizza meal in its courtyard. The church had admission fees of $1 per person over 6 years old. Across the street is the oldest house in United States. Admission is by donation.

Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

We explored Albuquerque, New Mexico in April 2015 during spring break. I was excited to take on the many National Parks and Monuments that dot the area surrounding both Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Our trip to New Mexico came out to be one of the least expensive we have had thus far, grand totaling at just under $700 for a whole week of exploration for our family of five (includes flight, hotel and rental car). Feel free to check out our family travel budget tips and budget friendly tips - New Mexico!

Rome (Roma), Lazio, Italy

Rome – where to start? Rome has so many attractions to cover, it was overwhelming to plan. Piazza Navona was our first stop, since our apartment was closeby. It sits on a 1st century AD racetrack, which is why the piazza is an oval in shape. Entrance to the piazza is free and it’s a cool place to come to enjoy the Italian evening stroll with hundreds of your fellow travelers.

Matera, Basilicata, Italy

Matera boasts a history of some 9000 years.  Some consider it the second oldest town in the world, after Jerusalem.  The oldest part is known as the Sassi.  There are 2 sassi – Sassi Barisano and Sassi Caveoso.  The sassi consists of homes and churches carved into tufa rock and alleyways connecting them.  Look for the alleys and roads that sometimes went over top of the cave homes and cave homes built right on top of one another.  The Sassi dwellers also had a method of collecting rainwater through a system of pipes and cisterns, all dug into rock.  Under Piazza Vittorio Veneto, the main piazza of modern Matera, there is a large cistern that collected rainwater for the townspeople up until the 19th century.